SPEECH Act

Thanks, Obama. For once, I mean that sincerely.

H.R. 2765, known as the SPEECH Act, was signed into legislation today. This act maintains that foreign libel laws shall have no jurisdiction in U.S. courts. In the eyes of the government, U.S. citizens shall enjoy the protections granted by the First Amendment, no matter where they- or their published works -are located. This ends the practice of “libel tourism,” where those who feel offended by works published in the U.S. sue American writers in countries where the courts do not recognize the freedom of speech, and then expect the foreign judgment to be upheld under the premise of “Comity.”

For the most part, prior to the passage of this law, domestic courts would not accept comity as a legitimate justification for bypassing First Amendment rights. Nevertheless, it’s good to have these things spelled out explicitly. It would have been even better if the Act were instead a constitutional amendment that applied to all freedoms contained within (since U.S. citizens are expected to pay U.S. taxes, no matter where they reside), but then the bill probably would not have passed, seeing as how some members of Congress aren’t so enthusiastic about one or two of those Amendments. That’s okay, one step at a time…

Advertisements

3 Responses to “SPEECH Act”

  1. Click Here Says:

    Many thanks for an excellent article which helped me to in the process, I’m happy for your labour in researching and scripting this blog

  2. Click Here Says:

    Very good job. Continue to keep posting!

  3. Roselle Abrecht Says:

    extreme tally you’ve admit


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: